Posts Tagged ‘Science’

  • His teaching was not intended to bring comfort but to shake people into awareness of the dangerous state of the world for which every individual was responsible since, according to him, every individual was the world in microcosm.
  • For discipleship, it was necessary to take leaps in the dark, to live dangerously, to feel strongly enough to be able to jump out of the window, to change oneself radically.
  • You must struggle for the same freedom. There must be constant turmoil within… I wish I could invent a new language but as I cannot I would like to destroy your old phraseology and conceptions. No one can give you liberation, you have to find it within… Liberation is not for the few, the chosen, the select.
  • You cannot help until you yourself are beyond the need of help.
  • Truth does not give hope; it gives understanding… If you would seek the Truth you must go out, far away from the limitations of the human mind and heart and there discover it – and that Truth is within yourself. Is it not much simpler to make Life itself the goal than to have mediators, gurus, who must inevitably step down the Truth and hence betray it? … Do not quote me afterwards as an authority. I refuse to be your crutch.
  • Of course there is neither good nor evil. Good is that of which you are not afraid; evil is that of which you are afraid. So, if you destroy fear, you are spiritually fulfilled… When you are in love with life, and you place that love before all things, and judge by that love, and not by your fear, then this stagnation which you call morality will disappear.
  • I maintain that Truth is a pathless land, and you cannot approach it by any path whatsoever, by any religion, by any sect. That is my point of view and I adhere to that absolutely and unconditionally… If you first understand that, then you will see how impossible it is to organize a belief. A belief is purely an individual matter, and you cannot and must not organize it. If you do, it becomes dead, crystallized; it becomes a creed, a sect, a religion, to be imposed on others.
  • Truth cannot be brought down, rather the individual must make the effort to ascend to it.
  • The moment you follow someone you cease to follow Truth.
  • I want to do something in the world and I’m going to do it with unwavering concentration.
  • Pure love is like the perfume of the rose, given to all. The sun does not care on whom it shines…
  • Look, one must have no beliefs or even ideas for they belong to all kinds of reactions and responses… if you are alert, free from ideas, beliefs, etc. in the present, then you can see infinitely and this perception is joy.
  • In everything, in all men, there is the totality, the completeness of life… By completeness I mean freedom of consciousness, freedom from individuality. That completeness which exists in everything cannot progress: it is absolute. The effort to acquire is futile, but if you can realize that Truth, happiness, exists in all things and that the realization of that Truth lies only through elimination, then there is a timeless understanding… By continually being self-recollected you become fully conscious, and then you liberate the mind and the heart and know harmony, which is completeness.
  • On the problem of sex: It has become a problem because there is no love. When we really love there is no problem, there is an adjustment, an understanding. It is only when we have lost the sense of true affection, that profound love in which there is no sense of possessiveness, that there arises the problem of sex. It is only when we have completely yielded ourselves to mere sensation that there are many problems concerning sex. As the majority of people have lost the joy of creative thinking, naturally they turn to the sensation of sex which becomes a problem, eating their minds and hearts away.
  • Choiceless awareness
    • Choice implies direction, an action of the will. K, as he explained it, was talking about awareness from moment to moment of all that was taking place inside oneself without any effort to change or direct it. It was a matter of pure observation, of looking, which would lead to self-transformation without effort.
  • No social reform would ever end human misery; people would always transform any new system into what they themselves were; throughout history every utopian revolutionary movement had reverted to the old order of things because the people in them had not changed at all; society of any kind was the result of the individual and the individual was the result of the society; the individual was you and me; society could not be transformed from the outside; it could be transformed only by transforming totally the human being, by each one of us, within himself.
  • There is a maturity that is not to be forced, not to be artificially stimulated.
  • One must be an individual, sane and balanced, not belonging to any race, country or to any particular ideology. Then perhaps sanity and peace will come back to the world.
  • Without changing our daily life we can’t have peace, and war is a spectacular expression of our daily conduct.
  • Thought inevitably breeds the feeling of ownership, that possessiveness which consciously or unconsciously cultivates jealousy. Where jealousy is, obviously love is not; and yet with most people, jealousy is taken as an indication of love… Thought is the greatest hindrance to love.
    • We fill our hearts with the things of the mind and therefore keep our hearts ever empty and expectant. It is the mind that clings, that is envious, that holds and destroys… We do not love and let it alone, but crave to be loved; we give in order to receive, which is the generosity of the mind and not of the heart. The mind is ever seeking certainty, security; and can love be made certain by the mind? Can the mind, whose very essence is of time, catch love, which is its own eternity?
  • The ignorant man is not the unlearned but he who does not know himself, and the learned man is stupid when he relies on books and knowledge and on authority to give him understanding. Understanding comes only through self-knowledge, which is awareness of one’s total psychological process. Thus education, in the true sense, is the the understanding of oneself, for it is in each of us that the whole of existence is gathered.
  • How necessary it is to die each day, to die each minute to everything, to the many yesterdays and to the moment that has just gone by! Without death there is no renewing, without death there is no creation. The burden of the past gives rise to its own continuity, and the worries of yesterday give new life to the worries of today.
    • The past and the unknown do not meet at any point; they cannot be brought together by any act whatsoever; there is no bridge to cross over nor a path that leads to it. The two has never met and will never meet. The past has to cease for the unknowable, for that immensity to be.
    • To be free of authority, of your own and that of another, is to die to everything of yesterday, so that your mind is always fresh, always young, innocent, full of vigor and passion.
  • As the eyes were closed, the body, the brain seemed to plunge into unfathomable depths, into states of incredible sensitivity and beauty.
  • The urge for the repetition of experience, however pleasant, beautiful, fruitful, is the soil in which sorrow grows.
    • It’s the thing that every human craves for and because they crave it, it eludes them.
  • Truth cannot be exact. What can be measured is not truth. That which is not living can be measured and its height be found.
  • … whether one found a talk more or less meaningful depended more on one’s own state of receptivity than on what he said.
  • It was the escape from loneliness that brought sorrow, not the fact of loneliness, of death; grief was self-pity, not love.
  • The self looks at all its inner states of being with its own conditioned mind and therefore what it sees is a replica of itself; what we are is what we see. The conception of a superior self which can direct one’s other selves is an illusion, for there is only one self.
  • Very simply put, thought is the response of memory, the past… When thought is functioning it is the past, therefore there is no new living at all; it is the past living in the present, modifying itself and the present.
    • All continuity is thought; when there is continuity there is nothing new.
  • The bondage is the demand for its continuation.
  • The only way to avoid sorrow is to be without any resistance, to be without any movement away from sorrow, outwardly or inwardly, to remain totally with sorrow without wanting to go beyond it.
  • Substitute for thinking the act of attention – the power to look.
  • Meditation is one of the greatest arts in life – perhaps the greatest, and one cannot possibly learn it from anybody. That is the beauty of it. It has no technique and therefore no authority. When you learn about yourself, watch yourself, watch the way you walk, how you eat, what you say, the gossip, the hate, the jealousy, if you are aware of all that in yourself, without any choice, that is part of meditation.
  • Fear arises from the desire for security.
    • If there is complete psychological security there is no fear, but there can never be psychological security if one is wanting, desiring, pursuing, becoming.
    • … thought is always trying to find a place where it can abide, abide in the sense of hold. What thought creates, being fragmentary, is total insecurity. Therefore there is complete security in being absolutely nothing – which means not a thing created by thought. To be absolutely nothing means a total contradiction of everything you have learned… You know what it means to be nothing? No ambition – which does not mean that you vegetate – no aggression, no resistance, no barriers built by hurt… The security that thought has created is no security. That is the absolute truth.
  • … fear is darkness and death is light.
  •  To know is not to know and the understanding of this fact that knowledge can never solve our human problem is intelligence.
  • The very suffering transformed into passion is enormous.
  • We are using the word mind to imply the senses, the capacity to think, and the brain that stores all the memories as experience, as knowledge… Knowledge corrupts the mind. Knowledge is the movement of the past, and when the past overshadows the actual, corruption takes place… We are using the word corruption to mean that which is broken up, that which is not taken as a whole.
  • [On god] Desire cannot possibly reach it, words cannot fathom it, nor can the string of thought wind itself around it.
  • All that we have learned, all that we are , the whole content of our consciousness, is the past stored in our memory as thought, and the cluttering up of the brain with the past means that there is no true insight because everything is seen through a cloud of thought which must always be limited by the self.
  • The content of our consciousness is the common ground of all humanity… a human being living in any part of the world suffers, not only physically but also inwardly.
  • Death means the ending of the known.
  • When you’re angry, anger is you. You are not different from anger.
  • We have invented God. Thought has invented God, that is we, out of misery, despair, loneliness, anxiety, have invented that thing called God. God has not made us in his image – I wish he had. Personally I have no belief in anything. The speaker only faces what is, what are facts, the realization of the nature of every fact, every thought, every reactions – he is totally aware of all that. If you are free from fear, from sorrow, there is no need for God.
  • Meditation at that hour was freedom and it was like entering into an unknown world of beauty and quietness; it was a world without image, symbol or word, without waves of memory. Love was in the death of every minute and each death was the returning of love. It was not attachment, it had no roots; it flowered without pause and it was a flame which burnt away the borders, the carefully built fences of consciousness. Meditation was joy and with it came benediction.
  • Everything on earth, on this beautiful earth, lives, dies, comes into being and withers away. To grasp this whole movement of life requires intelligence, not the intelligence of thought, or books, or knowledge, but the intelligence of love and compassion with its sincerity.
  • Surely creation can take place only when thought is silent… Science is the movement of knowledge gathering more and more and more. The “more” is the measurement, and thought can be measured because it is a material process. Knowledge has its own limited insight, its own limited creation, but this brings conflict. We are talking about holistic perception in which the ego, the “me”, the personality, does not enter at all. Then only is there this thing called creativity. That is it.
  • And when there is an end to sorrow there is passion; not lust, not sensory stimulation, but passion.
  • To learn about, to understand, oneself, all authority must be set aside… There is nothing to be learned from anybody, including the speaker… The speaker has nothing to teach you. The speaker is merely acting as a mirror in which you can see yourself. Then when you can see yourself clearly you can discard the mirror.
  • Intelligence is common to all of us and that will bring us together, not organization. If you see the importance that each one of us is free and that freedom implies love, consideration, attention, co-operation, compassion – that intelligence is the factor to keep us together.
  • Independence without freedom is meaningless. If you have freedom you don’t need independence.
  • A religious center, not in the orthodox sense of the word; a center where a flame is living, not the ashes of it.
  • It was a question of being, not of accomplishment.
  • Creation is something that is most holy. That’s the most sacred thing in life and if you have made a mess of your life, change it. Change it today, not tomorrow. If you are uncertain find out why and be certain. If your thinking is not straight, think straight, logically. Unless all that is prepared, all that is settled, you can’t enter into this world of creation.
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God is within you and all around you. – St. Thomas, Gospel of the Christ

  • The truth is still the truth no matter how much man distorts it.
  • Mankind long ago lived not from the mind, but the heart. It was dreaming that created the world, but now it is thinking that is shaping our way of life.
    • Mankind has moved away from the heart of the world to the logic of the mind.
    • And yet, modern man has created, with its great science, which it is certain is the ultimate “truth,” a world on the brink of total destruction in less than two hundred years and perhaps only a few years left to exist if something drastic is not done. Whereas ancient man, with its silly ceremonies, managed to sustain itself for millions of years. Perhaps if we wish to survive at all, we should consider this ancient wisdom, at least to understand, even with our logical mind, how it is possible that ceremony actually can create a world in balance.
  • It is not the mind that is so brilliant, but the light of the world that comes from the heart.
    • Creation always beings in the heart, and then it is transferred to the mind.
  • Love is the answer to every question – even the questions of the mind.
  • Life may appear as a mysterious journey, but from within the heart it is child’s play.
  • …there is only One Consciousness and anything can be known and experienced. There are no secrets in the One Universe.
  • Ascension is not necessarily leaving the Earth, as some suggest – it is a change in consciousness, or a change in how one interprets the One Reality.
  • The idea of failure or more work is only the part of your dream that still believes in separation.

Beauty before me
Beauty behind me
Beauty on my left
Beauty on my right
Beauty above me
Beauty below me
Beauty is love
Love is God.
– Prayer of Cradle Flower of the Taos Pueblo

  • After all, any scientist knows that our only proof that the stars and the planets actually exist is based upon the electrical impulses within our brain and body, and our five senses. But sensing does not prove that anything exists; it actually proves nothing.
  • Hongi – Maori greeting of touching their foreheads and noses together and breathing together.
  • Inside the human heart is a special place where all of creation is conceived.
    • Inside your heart is a tiny place where all knowledge and wisdom resides. Whatever you need on all levels of your existence is there for you.
  • Like a seed, your future is only beginning to emerge out of the darkness, but someday you will look back and realize that all the fear and distress was only a dream created from the confusion of the ending of one cycle and the beginning of another.
  • This feeling of being lonely and very temporary visitors in the universe is in flat contradiction to everything know about man (and all other living organisms) in the sciences. We do not “come into” this world; we come out of it, as leaves from a tree. As the ocean “waves,” the universe “peoples.” Every individual is an expression of the whole realm of nature, a unique action of the total universe.
    • The first result of this illusion is that our attitude to the world “outside” us is largely hostile. We are forever “conquering” nature, space, mountains, deserts, bacteria, and insects instead of learning to cooperate with them in a harmonious order.
    • The hostile attitude of conquering nature ignores the basic interdependence of all things and events – that the world beyond the skin is actually an extension of our own bodies – and will end in destroying the very environment from which we emerge and upon which our whole life depends.
  • Religions are divisive and quarrelsome. They are a form of one-upmanship because they depend upon separating the “saved” from the “damned,” the true believers from the heretics, the in-group from the out-group. Even religious liberals play the game of “we’re-more-tolerant-than-you.”
    • Furthermore, as systems of doctrine, symbolism, and behavior, religious harden into institutions that must command loyalty, be defended and kept “pure,” and because all belief is fervent hope, and thus a cover-up for doubt and uncertainty – religions must make converts.
    • No considerate God would destroy the human mind by making it so rigid and inadaptable as to depend upon one book, the Bible, for all the answers. For the use of words, and thus of a book, is to point beyond themselves to a world of life and experience that is not mere words or even ideas.
  • Irrevocable commitment to any religion is not only intellectual suicide; it is positive unfaith because it closes the mind to any new vision of the world. Faith is, above all, openness – an act of trust in the unknown.
  • The Book that I would like to slip to my children would itself be slippery. It would slip them into a new domain, not of ideas alone, but of experience and feeling. It would be a temporary medicine, not a diet; a point of departure, not a perpetual point of reference.
  • The most strongly enforced of all known taboos is the taboo against knowing who or what you really are behind the mask of your apparently separate, independent, and isolated ego.
  • …myself does not reside in the drop alone, but in the whole surge of energy which ranges from the galaxies to the nuclear fields in my body. At this level of existence “I” am immeasurably old; my forms are infinite and their comings and goings are simply the pulses or vibrations of a single and eternal flow of energy.
  • Genuine love comes from knowledge, not from a sense of duty or guilt.
  • Yet remember, this story of the cycles of the world’s appearance and disappearance is myth, not science, parable rather than prophecy.
  • The very things that we believe to exist are always on/offs. Ons alone and offs alone do not exist.
    • Although sounds of high vibration seem to be continuous, to be pure sound, they are not. Every sound is actually sound/silence, only the ear does not register this consciously when the alternation is too rapid.
    • Light, too, is not pure light, but light/darkness.
  • Space is the relationship between bodies; and without it there can be neither energy nor motion.
    • Things are said to move only when compared with others that are relatively still, for motion is motion/stillness.
    • But the mistake in the beginning was to think of solids and space as two different things, instead of as two aspects of the same thing. The point is that they are different but inseparable.
      • Take away the crest of the wave, and there is no trough.
  • Attention is narrowed perception.
    • It is a way of looking at life bit by bit, using memory to string the bits together – as when examining a dark room with a flash light having a very narrow beam.
    • The narrow slit in the fence is much like the way in which we look at life by conscious attention, for when we attend to something we ignore everything else.
    • To these we attend, and the rest we ignore – for which reason conscious attention is at the same time ignorance despite the fact that it gives us a vividly clear picture of whatever we choose to notice.
    • We also speak of attention as noticing. To notice is to select, to regard some bits of perception, or some features of the world, as more noteworthy, more significant, than others.
  • It is hard to notice anything for which the languages available to us (whether verbal, mathematical, or musical) have no description.
  • We do not play the Game of Black-and-White – the universal game of up/down, on/off, solid/space, and each/all. Instead, we play the game of Black-versus-White or more usually, White-versus-Black.
    • …We are doing something as crazy as trying to keep the mountains and get rid of the valleys.
  • Imagination cannot grasp simple nothingness and must therefore fill the void with fantasies…
  • Power is not necessarily wisdom. I may have virtual omnipotence in the government of my body and my physical environment, but how am I to control myself so as to avoid folly and error in its use?
  • The question is then whether technical progress actually “gets anywhere” in the sense of increasing the delight and happiness of life.
    • …all too soon these new contrivances are taken for granted, and we find ourselves oppressed with the new predicaments which they bring with them.
  • However much we divide, count, sort, or classify this wiggling into particular things and events, this is no more than a way of thinking about the world: it is never actually divided.
  • Problems that remain persistently insoluble should always be suspected as questions asked in the wrong way, like the problem of cause and effect.
  • The definition of a thing or event must include definition of its environment, we realize that any given thing goes with a given environment so intimately and inseparably that it is more difficult to draw a clear boundary between the thing and its surroundings.
    • Asking “What does it do?” is not enough. We must also ask, “In what surroundings is it doing it?”
  • Your soul, or rather your essential Self, is the whole cosmos as it is centered around the particular time, place, and activity called John Doe. Thus the soul is not in the body, but the body in the soul, and the soul is the entire network of relationships and processes which make up your environment, and apart from which you are nothing.
    • The human individual is not built as a car is built. He does not come into being by assembling parts, by screwing a head onto a neck, by wiring a brain to a set of lungs, or by welding veins to a heart. Head, neck, heart, lungs, brain, veins, muscles, and glands are separate names but not separate events, and these events grow into being simultaneously and interdependently. In precisely the same way, the individual is separate from his universal environment only in name. when this is not recognized, you have been fooled by your name.
  • Double-bind – a person is put in a double-bind by a command or request which contains a concealed contradiction.
    • Stop being self-conscious!
    • Try to relax.
  • The social double-bind game:
    • The first rule of this game is that it is not a game.
    • Everyone must play.
    • You must love us.
    • You must go on living.
    • Be yourself, but play a consistent and acceptable role.
    • Control yourself and be natural.
    • Try to be sincere.
  • Instead of giving our children clean and explicit explanations of the game rules of the community, we befuddle them hopelessly because we – as adults – were once so befuddled, and, remaining so, do not understand the game we are playing.
  • Faith – in life, in other people, and in oneself – is the attitude of allowing the spontaneous to be spontaneous, in its own way and in its own time. That is, of course, risky because life and other people do not always respond to faith as we might wish.
    • But to take the gamble out of the game, to try to make winning a dead certainty, is to achieve a certainty which is indeed dead.
    • The alternative to a community based on mutual trust is a totalitarian police-state, a community in which spontaneity is virtually forbidden.
  • Every individual is a unique manifestation of the Whole, as every branch is a particular outreaching of the tree.
    • Differentiation is not separation.
  • Because he is now so largely defined as a separate person caught up in a mindless and alien universe, his principal task is to get one-up on the universe and to conquer nature. This is palpably absurd, and since the task is never achieved, the individual is taught to live and work for some future in which the impossible will at last happen, if not for him, then at least for his children. We are thus breeding a type of human being incapable of living in the present – that is, of really living.
    • You will never, never be able to sit back with full contentment and say, “Now, I’ve arrived!” Your entire education has deprived you of this capacity because it was preparing you for the future, instead of showing you how to be alive now.
  • For our pleasures are not material pleasures but symbols of pleasure – attractively packaged but inferior in content.
  • Gestalt theory of perception – no figure is ever perceived except in relation to a background.
  • We do not easily notice that all features of the world hold their boundaries in common with the areas that surround them – that the outline of the figure is also the inline of the background.
  • The difficulty is that most languages are arranged so that actions (verbs) have to be set in motion by things (nouns), and we forget that rules of grammar are not necessarily rules, or patterns, of nature.
    • For the organism is sometimes a running process, sometimes a standing process, sometimes a sleeping process, and so on, and in each instance the “cause” of the behavior is the situation as a whole, the organism/environment. Indeed, it would be best to drop the idea of causality and use instead the idea of relativity.
  • It is what it does. More precisely, the organism, including its behavior, is a process which is to be understood only in relation to the larger and longer process of its environment.
    • The whole is a pattern which has no separate parts.
    • Parts are fictions of language – parts exist only for purposes of figuring and describing.
  • It is easy enough to see that an intelligent human being implies an intelligent human society, for thinking is a social activity – a mutual interchange of messages and ideas based on such social institutions as languages, sciences, libraries, universities, and museums.
  • No current will “flow” through a wire until the positive pole is connected with the negative, or, to put it very simply, no current will start unless it has a point of arrival, and a living organism is a “point of arrival” apart from which there can never be the “currents” or phenomena of light, heat, weight, hardness, and so forth.

The fool who persists in his folly will become wise. – William Blake

  • We have lacked the proper self-respect of recognizing that I, the individual organism, am a structure of such fabulous ingenuity that it calls the whole universe into being.
    • We have lacked the real humility of recognizing that we are members of the biosphere, the “harmony of contained conflicts” in which we cannot exist at all without the cooperation of [everything].

…the world cannot be analyzed correctly into distinct parts; instead, it must be regarded as an indivisible unit in which separate parts appear as valid approximations only in the classical [i.e. Newtonian] limit…Thus at the quantum level of accuracy, an object does not have any “intrinsic” properties (for instance, wave or particle) belonging to itself alone; instead, it shares all its properties mutually and indivisibly with the systems with which it interacts. Moreover, because a given object, such as an electron, interacts at different potentialities, it undergoes…continual transformation between the various forms (for instance, wave or particle form) in which it can manifest itself.

Although such fluidity and dependence of form on the environment have not been found, before the advent of quantum theory, at the level of elementary particles in physics, they are not uncommon…in fields, such as biology, which deal with complex systems. Thus, under suitable environmental conditions, a bacterium can develop into a spore stage, which is completely different in structure, and vice versa. – David Bohm, Quantum Theory

  • For eternally and always there in only now, one and the same now; the present is the only thing that has no end.
  • Man so defined and so experienced is, of course, incapable of pleasure and contentment, let alone creative power. Hoaxed into the illusion of being an independent, responsible source of actions, he cannot understand why what he does never comes up to what he should do, to a society which has defined him as separate cannot persuade him to behave as if he really belonged. Thus he feels chronic guilt and makes the most heroic efforts to placate his conscience.
    • The separate person is without content, in both senses of the word. He lives perpetually on hope, on looking forward to tomorrow, having been brought up this way from childhood…
  • If you know what you want, and will be content with it, you can be trusted.
    • But if you do not know, your desires are limitless and no one can tell how to deal with you. For whom that does not know what he wants, everyone suspects that there are limitless strings attached to his gifts.
  • No work of love will flourish out of guilt, fear, or hollowness of heart, just as no valid plans for the future can be made by those who have no capacity for living now.

Part of the blessedness of the saints in Heaven was that they could look over the battlements and enjoy the “proper justice” of the sinners squirming in Hell. – Saint Thomas Aquinas

  • All winners need losers; all saints need sinners; all sages need fools.

If I am I because you are you, and if you are you because I am I, them I am not I, you are not you. – A Hassidic rabbi

  • How to get over the sensation of being locked out from everything “other,” of being only oneself – an organism flung into unavoidable competition and conflict with almost every “object” in its experience?
  • Nothing unites a community so much as common cause against an external enemy, yet, in the same moment, that enemy becomes the essential support of social unity.
    • Therefore larger societies require larger enemies.
  • The more resolute you plumb the question “Who or what am I?” – the more you unavoidable is the realization that you are nothing at all apart from everything else.
  • When this feeling of separateness is approached and accepted like any other sensation, it evaporates like the mirage that it is.
  • There is, indeed, no compulsion unless there is also freedom of choice, for the sensation of behaving involuntarily is known only by contrast with that of behaving voluntarily.

When purpose has been used to achieve purposelessness, the thing has been grasped. – The Secret of the Golden Flower

  • To play so as to be relaxed and refreshed for work is not to play, and no work is well and finely done unless it, too, is a form of play.
  • The word is a spell (in Latin, Fascinum), an enchantment (being thrilled by a chant), an amazement (being lost in a maze), an arabesque of such stunning rhythm and a plot so intriguing that we are drawn by its web into a state of involvement where we forget that it is a game…It is simultaneously the purest nonsense and the utmost artistry.
  • The universe is at root a magical illusion and a fabulous game, and that there is no separate “you” to get something out of it, as if life were a bank to be robbed. The only real “you” is the one that comes and goes, manifests and withdraws itself eternally in and as every conscious being. For “you” is the universe looking at itself from billions of points of view, points that come and go so that the vision is forever new. What we see as death, empty space, or nothingness is only the trough between the crests of this endlessly waving ocean. It is all part of the illusion that there should seem to be something to be gained in the future, and that there is an urgent necessity to go on and on until we get it. Yet just as there is no time but the present, and no one except the all-and-everything, there is never anything to be gained – though the zest of the game is to pretend that there is.
  • If we want justice for minorities and cooled wars with our natural enemies, whether human or nonhuman, we must first come to terms with the minority and the enemy in ourselves and in our own hearts, for the rascal is there as much as anywhere in the “external” world – especially when you realize that the world outside your skin is as much yourself as the world inside.
  • The goal of action is always contemplation – knowing and being rather than seeking and becoming.
  • Nothing so eludes conscious inspections consciousness itself. This is why the root of consciousness has been called, paradoxically, the unconsciousness.
  • Just as true humor is laughter at oneself, true humanity is knowledge of oneself.
  • Anyone who thinks at all must be a philosopher – a good one or a bad one – because it is impossible to think without premises, without basic (and in this sense, metaphysical) assumptions about what is sensible, what is the good life, what is beauty, and what is pleasure. To hold such assumptions, consciously or unconsciously, is to philosophize.
  • Chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy are special fascination with the details of our environment, but metaphysics is fascination with the whole thing.
  • Thought and sensation are analytical and selective, and thus present the world as no more than a multiplicity of things and events.

What guarantee is there that the five senses, taken together, do cover the whole of possible experience? They cover simply our actual experience, our human knowledge of facts or events. There are gaps between the fingers; there are gaps between the senses. In these gaps is the darkness which hides the connection between things…This darkness is the source of our vague fears and anxieties, but also the home of the gods. They alone see the connections, the total relevance of everything that happens; that which now comes to us in bits and pieces, the “accidents” which exist only in our heads, in our limited perceptions. – Idris Parry

  • All knowledge is a recognition of the mutual relations between sense experiences and/or things and events.
    • All things are known by their differences from and likeness to each other.
  • Enantiodromia – the attainment of any extreme position is the point where it begins to turn into its own opposite.
  • Listen intently to a voice singing without words. It may charm you into crying, force you to dance, fill you with rage, or make you jump for joy. You can’t tell where the music ends and the emotions begin, for the whole thing is a kind of music – the voice playing on your nerves as the breath plays on a flute. All experience is just that, except that its music has many more dimension than sound. It vibrates in the dimensions of sight, touch, taste, and smell, and in the intellectual dimension of symbols and words – all evoking and playing upon each other.
  • For this unity is not mere oneness as opposed to multiplicity, since these two terms are themselves polar. The unity, or inseparability, of one and many is therefore referred to in Vedanta philosophy as “non-duality” (advaita) to distinguish it from simply uniformity.
    • Language can no more transcend duality than paintings or photographs upon a flat surface can go beyond two dimensions. Yet by the convention of perspective, certain two-dimensional lines that slant towards a “vanishing-point” are taken to represent the third dimension of depth.
    • In a similar way, the dualistic term “non-duality” is taken to represent the “dimension” in which explicit differences have implicit unity.
  • What lies beyond opposites must be discussed, if at all, in terms of opposites, and this means using the language of analogy, metaphor, and myth.
  • The difficulty is not only that language is dualistic, insofar as words are labels for mutually exclusive classes. The problem is that IT is so much more myself than I thought I was, so central and basic to my existence, that I cannot make it an object. There is no way to stand outside IT, and, in fact, no need to do so. For so long as I am trying to grasp IT, I am implying that IT is not really myself. If it were possible, I am losing the sense of it by attempting to find it. This is why those who really know that they are IT invariably say they do not understand it, for IT understands understanding – not the other way around. One cannot, and need no, go deeper than deep!
  • It is difficult not to feel the force of the image, because images sway our emotions more deeply than conceptions.

Nothing is left to you at this moment but to have a good laugh! – Zen saying

  • We [The separate selves] do not trust the universe to repeat what it has already done – to “I” itself again and again. We see it as a eternal arena in which the individual is no more than a temporary stranger – a visitor who hardly belongs – for the thin ray of consciousness does not shine upon its own source. In looking out upon the world, we forget that the world is looking at itself – through our eyes and IT’s.

 

Posted: February 28, 2011 in Quotes
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Science cannot be stopped. Man will gather knowledge no matter what the consequences — and we cannot predict what they will be. Science will go on — whether we are pessimistic, or are optimistic, as I am. I know that great, interesting, and valuable discoveries can be made and will be made… But I know also that still more interesting discoveries will be made that I have not the imagination to describe — and I am awaiting them, full of curiosity and enthusiasm.

– Linus Pauling

 

  • Knowledge filter – This is a fundamental feature of science. It is also a fundamental feature of human nature. People tend to filter out things that don’t fit, that don’t make sense in terms of their paradigm or their ways of thinking. So in science you find that evidence that don’t fit the accepted paradigm tends to be eliminated. It’s not taught, it’s not discussed, and people who are educated and scientifically teachings generally don’t even learn about it.
  • It is not necessarily a deliberate conspiracy in the sense of some people getting together in a smoke-filled room and saying we are going to deceive people. It is something that happened automatically within the scientific community. So when a given piece of evident disagrees with the predominate theory, that automatically people won’t talk about it, they won’t report it. That means science fails to progress in a way one would hope.
  • London’s Natural History Museum. It looks rather like a cathedral or a church. In a way, it is what it is. It is a temple to Darwin’s theory of evolution.
    • This representation is a interpretation of the fossils, the interpretation of one group of scientists. There are other interpretations. But you won’t find them in this museum, or any other museums in the world.
  • The missing link – ape and man
  • Hapgood’s Theory of Earth Crust Displacement
  • We are a species with amnesia. We have forgotten something of great importance from our own past. When we recover it, we will realize for a start that our civilization isn’t the apex of the creation, it isn’t the pinnacle towards which everything has been building throughout all of geological time. Rather it’s part of an up and down, a flow, that it is possible for a civilization to reach a very high level of advancement and be wipe out. This is something that we’ve never confront it and we need to confront it.

[The Nine Insights]

  • All that any of us have to do is suspend our doubts and distractions just long enough…
  • Even though we occasionally have the clear insight that something more is going on in life, our habitual way of thinking is to consider such ideas unknowable and then to shrug off the awareness altogether.
  • History is not just the evolution of technology; it is the evolution of thought.
    • By understanding the reality of the people who came before us, we can see why we look at the world the way we do, and what our contribution is toward further progress. We can pinpoint where we come in, so to speak, in the longer development of Civilization, and that gives us a sense of where we are going.
  • Working to establish a more comfortable style of survival has grown to feel complete in itself as a reason to live, and we’ve gradually, methodically, forgotten why we are alive, what we’re surviving for.
    • People can’t slow down because they use their routine to distract themselves, to reduce life to only its practical considerations. And they do this to avoid recalling how uncertain they are about why they live.
    • Propelling it all was the call to progress, the desire of the individual to provide his own security, his own purpose while he was waiting for the truth.
    • We are reaching a climax in our cultural purpose. We are accomplishing what we had collectively decided to do – we have created the means of material security.
      • Now we seemed to be ready – poised, in fact – to find out why we had done it and waking up to something else.
  • The idea was to create an understanding of the universe that made the world seem safe and manageable, and the skeptical attitude kept us focused on concrete problems that would make our existence seem more secure.
    • With this attitude, science systematically removed the uncertain and the esoteric from the world. We concluded, following the thinking of Isaac Newton, that the universe always operated in a predictable manner, like an enormous machine, because for a long time that’s all it could be proved to be. Events which happened simultaneously to other events yet had no causal relationship were said to occur only by chance.
  • The whole of Einstein’s life’s work was to show that what we perceive as hard matter is mostly empty space with a pattern of energy running through it.
  • The human perception of energy first begins with a heightened sensitivity to beauty.
    • When you appreciate the beauty and uniqueness of things, you receive energy. When you get to a level where you feel love, then you can send the energy back just by willing it so.
    • The things that we perceive as beautiful may be different, but the actual characteristics we ascribe to beautiful objects are similar.
      • When something strikes us as beautiful, it displays more presence and sharpness of shape and vividness of color – it stands out; it shines.
  • We humans have always sought to increase our personal energy in the only manner we have known: by seeking to psychologically steal it from others – an unconscious competition that underlies all human conflict in the world.
    • Humans seek to outwit and control each other not just because of some tangible goal in the outside world that we’re trying to achieve, but because of a lift we get psychologically. This is the reason we see so many irrational conflicts in the world both at the individual level and at the level of nations.
      • Individuals can come away feeling strong or feeling weak, depending on what occurs in the interaction.
  • …Unfortunately, when she grows up, because of this early trauma, she will think she has to seize control and dominate others with the same intensity.
  • Occasionally, another person will voluntarily want us to define their situation for them, giving us their energy outright.
    • It makes us feel empowered, but this gift doesn’t usually last. Most people aren’t strong enough to keep giving energy.
    • Humans link up energy and then fight over who is going to control it – power struggle.
  • Humans are stuck in a kind of competition for each other’s energy.
    • When we can get others to acquiesce to our view, they identify with us and that pulls their energy into us and we feel stronger.
  • In order to totally absorb energy in food, the food must be appreciated and savored.
    • Taste is the doorway. You must appreciate taste. This is the reason for prayer before eating. It is not just about being thankful, it is to make eating a holy experience, so the energy from the food can enter your body.
  • You do not make yourself love. You allow love to enter you.
  • When one has already encountered a mystical experience, getting back into this state and raising one’s personal energy level comes much easier.
    • A stronger memory of the experience facilitates its re-creation.
  • When something occurs beyond chance to lead us forward in our lives, then we become more actualized people.
    • We feel though we are attaining what destiny is leading us to become. When this occurs, the level of energy that brought on the coincidences in the first place is instituted in us -> We have become a new person. We exist at a level of higher energy, a level of higher vibration.
  • Everyone manipulates for energy either aggressively, directly forcing people to pay attention to them, or passively, playing on people’s sympathy or curiosity to gain attention.
    • The order of dramas from aggressive to passive:
      • Intimidator, interrogator, aloof, poor me.
  • We are truly free to become more than the unconscious act we play. We can find a higher meaning for our lives, a spiritual reason…We can begin to get clear about who we really are.
  • We can’t progress by using logic alone. We have to attain a fuller consciousness, an inner connection with God, because only then can our evolution toward something better be guided by a higher part of ourselves.
  • Once you get the questions right, the answers always come.
  • The learned manipulations on the child’s part can be avoided if the adults give them all the energy they need no matter what the situation.
    • You should never take responsibility for more children than you can give attention to.

When love first happens, the two individuals are giving each other energy unconsciously and both people feel buoyant and elated. That’s the incredible high we all call being “in love.” Unfortunately, once they expect this feeling to come from the other person, they cut themselves off from the energy in the universe and begin to rely even more on the energy from each other – only now there doesn’t seem to be enough and so they stop giving each other energy and fall back into their dramas in an attempt to control each other and force the other’s energy their way. At this point the relationship degenerates into the usual power struggle.

  • The reason we can become addicted to someone of the opposite sex is that we’ve yet to access this opposite sex energy ourselves.
    • The mystical energy that we can tap as an inner source is both male and female.

Co-dependent relationship: We look like the letter “C.” We are very susceptible to a person of the opposite sex, some other circle half complete, coming up and joining with us – completing the circle that way – and giving us a burst of euphoria and energy that feels like the wholeness that a full connection with the universe produces. In reality, we have only joined up with another person who is looking for their other half on the outside too. The problem with this completed person, this “O,” that both people think they have reached, is that it has taken tow people to make this one whole person, one supply the female energy and one supplying the male. This one whole person consequently has two heads, or egos. Both people want to run this whole person they have created and so, just as in childhood, both people want to command the other, as if the other were themselves. This kind of illusion of completeness always breaks down into a power struggle.

  • Higher-relationship: when we connect romantically with another whole person, we create a super-person. It never pulls us from the path of our individual evolution.
    • First we have to complete the circle on our own. We have to stabilize our channel with the universe.
  • It is the same way with all addictions – one goes through someone or something else to connect with the universe.
  • Whenever people cross our paths, there is always a message for us. Chance encounters do not exist.
    • Once humans grasp this reality, our interaction will slow down and become more purposeful and deliberate.
  • The more we can love and appreciate others, the more energy flows into us.
    • The more we appreciate their wholeness, their inner beauty, the more the energy flows into them, and naturally, the more that flows into us.
  • Covert manipulations for energy cannot exist if you bring them into consciousness by pointing them out.
  • When you are appreciating someone at a deeper level, you can see their most honest self beyond any facades they may put up. When you really focus at this level, you can perceive that someone is thinking as a subtle expression on their face. This is perfectly natural.
  • Learn to interact consciously when in a group – as the members of a group talk, only one will have the most powerful idea at any one point in time. If they are alert, the others in the group can feel who is about to speak, and then they can consciously focus their energy on this person, helping to bring out his idea with the greatest clarity.
  • When we dislike someone, or feel threatened by someone, the natural tendency is to focus on something we dislike about the person, something that irritates us. Unfortunately, when we do this – instead of seeing the deeper beauty of the person and giving them energy – we take energy away and actually do them harm. All they know is that they suddenly feel less beautiful and less confident, and it is because we sapped their energy. Humans are aging each other at a tremendous rate out there with their violent competitions.
  • Sometimes in history one individual would grasp the exact way of connecting with God’s source of energy and direction and would thus become a lasting example that this connection is possible. E.g. Jesus.

  • …still he is not likely to allow objectivity to nudge him off the pillar of his own perspective.
  • Logic only gives man what he needs. Magic gives him what he wants.
  • The most important thing in life is style. That is, the style of one’s existence – the characteristic mode of one’s actions – is basically, ultimately what matters. For if man defines himself by doing, then style is doubly definitive because style describe the doing.
  • Happiness is a learned condition. And since it is learned and self-generating, it does not depend upon external circumstances for it perpetuation.
  • It is in the realm of High Mystery that certain men and women are destined to act out their lives.
  • When she was a small girl, Amanda hid a ticking clock in an old rotten tree trunk. It drove woodpeckers crazy. Ignoring tasty bugs all around them, they just about beat their brains out trying to get at the clock. Years later, Amanda used the woodpecker experiment as a model for understanding capitalism, Communism, Christianity and all other systems that traffic in future rewards rather than in present realities.
  • America is no more a democracy than Russia is a Communist state…We both have the same basic form of government: economic totalitarianism. There’s only a difference of degree.
  • Man’s peculiarly ambivalent psyche permits him to operate simultaneously according to two opposing codes. There is the code which he professes to live by, and there is the code to whose standards he actually does adhere. The deceit is so ingrained and subtle that most men truly are unaware of it…
  • To simply “say” that a desire is immoral – or, resorting to even flimsier abstraction, to deem the fulfillment of a desire illegal – does not eliminate the desire. It does not eliminate anything except straightforwardness. It creates, in addition to a climate of deception, an underworld into which men “descend” in order to partake of Code B services not permitted under the provisions of Code A.
    • The underworld persists because society needs it, insists upon it, supports it (at the same time that it denies and persecutes it, or course).
  • In the wild, the battle for survival is unrelenting. Hunger follows the animal like a shadow.
  • As unrefined and basic as an animal’s emotional equipment may be, it s not insensitive to freedom.
    • Somewhere in the archives of crudest instinct is recorded the truth that it is better to be endangered and free than captive and comfortable.
    • Whether meaningful or meaningless, the game of life is there to be played – and the animal in his animal way sees to “know” it and the cage is an offense to what his inner animal voice tells him is right and true.
  • When a man confines an animal in a cage, he assumes ownership of that animal. But an animal is an individual; it cannot be owned. When a man tries to own an individual whether that individual be another man, an animal or even a tree, he suffers the psychic consequences of an unnatural act.
    • A creature, human or otherwise, that has had its freedom compromised has been degraded. In a subconscious reaction that combines guilt, fear, and contempt, the keepers of the caged – even the observers of the caged are degraded themselves. The cage is a double degrader.
    • Any bar, whether concrete or intangible, that stands between a living thing and its liberty is communicable perversity, dangerous to the sanity of everyone concerned.
  • Alienation is a disease of the unsoiled.
    • The further we separate ourselves from the dirt, the further we separate ourselves from ourselves.

No particle of living energy is ever extinguished, no particle is ever created anew. – Ernst Haeckel

  • Action, like sounds, divide the flow of time into beats.
  • The drummer deals almost exclusively with rhythm, therefore he is an architect of energy.
    • Art is not eternal. Only energy is eternal.
  • History is a discipline of aggregate bias.
  • The scientist keep the romantic honest and the romantic keeps the scientist human.
  • …[he] has eaten at many tables and has not been nourished.
  • In an electronic technology, cultural changes occur more rapidly than value systems can accommodate them, and in the resulting confusion technology itself becomes a surrogate religion.
    • The fault lay not in modern man’s blindness but in an outdated church’s camouflage.
    • Major technological breakthroughs, such as the ones in electronics and psycho-chemistry that have occurred in our era, inevitably alter man’s image of himself, of his environment and his deity.
  • There was no revolution. There was spiritual evolution – an infinitely more profound and permanent process.
  • Christianity was born and everything that is born must die, philosophical systems no exception.
  • Ambivalence is a bigger nuisance than schizophrenia. When you’re schizoid each of your two personalities is blissfully ignorant of the other, but when you’re ambivalent each half of you is painfully aware of the conflicting half, and if you aren’t careful your whole life can turn into a taffy pull.
  • Science is an active response to the world. Mysticism accepts the world.
    • Mystics scurry about trying to get in harmony with nature. Scientists turn nature to issues which we define.
    • Science is resistance, rather than acceptance.
  • There are three mental states that interest me [Amanda]: amnesia, euphoria, ecstasy.
    • Amnesia is not knowing who one is and wanting desperately to find out.
    • Euphoria is not knowing who one is and not caring.
    • Ecstasy is knowing exactly who one is – and still not caring.
  • Among the Haida Indians of the Pacific Northwest, the verb for “making poetry” is the same as the verb “to breathe.”
  • Was it when man initiated the division of labor that he lost contact with the complete reality and began to fragment and go numb?
  • Men who lust for power, who are addicted to laws and other unhealthy abstractions, who long to govern and lead and censor and order and reward and punish; those men are the turds of Moloch, men who don’t know how to love, men who are sickly afraid of death and therefore are afraid of life: they fear all that is chaotic and unruly and free-moving and changing – thus they fear nature and fear life itself, they deny life and in so doing deny God.
  • Authority is the most damaging trauma to which the psyche is subjected between birth and death.

I must invent my own systems or else be enslaved by other men’s. – William Blake

  • We can live on top of content, float above the predictable responses, social programming and hereditary circuitry, letting the bits of color and electricity and light filter up to us, where we may incorporate them at will into our actions –freedom to be free of languages and leaders and gods. We must use style to alter content – a style that is masterful that it is fluid and at the same time complete.
  • Marriage is not a synonym for monogamy any more than monogamy is a synonym for ideal love.
  • Every system that science proposed was a product of human imagination and had to be accepted with faith nearly as blind as the religious beliefs which he had jettisoned.
  • What difference does it make who you are when you wake up as long as you wake up somebody?
  • Laws are abstractions. Laws symbolize ethical arts, proper behavior toward other human animals. Laws have no moral content, they merely symbolize conduct that does.
    • If we respected each other, if we respected animals and if we respected the land, then we could dispense with laws and cut the middleman out of morality.
    • Rather than “Drive Legally” we would have “Drive Lovingly.”
  • But good or bad, they – being human – couldn’t carry on without their faith.
  • You can’t find truth if you start with a false premise, and Western traditions, the best and the worst of it, has always moved from the false premise of Christian divinity.
  • Christianity as a religion is at best a distortion of the teachings of Christ, and at worst, is an authoritarian system that limits man’s liberty and represses the human spirit.
    • Christianity isn’t based on nature, it’s based on a political model. As far back as the Emperor Constantine, the authoritarians spotted Christianity as the perfect front, and they’ve been using poor old Jesus ever since – using him to bolster their business, to sanction their armies and to generally yoke and manipulate the people.
  • Christianity is simply too ineffectual (on a spiritual level) and too contradictory (on an intellectual level) to survive.

Men lead lives of quiet desperation. – Henry David Thoreau

  • Life isn’t stable. Stability is unnatural.
    • The only stable society is the police state. You can have a free society or you can have a stable society. You can’t have both. Take your choice.
    • The world is perpetually changing. It doesn’t do much else but change.
  • The clown (freedom) is always being chased by the policeman (authority). Clowns are funny precisely because their shy hopes lead invariably to brief flings of (exhilarating?) disorder followed by crushing retaliation from the status quo. It delights us to watch a careless clown break taboos; it thrills us vicariously to watch him run wild and free; it reassures us to see him slapped down and order restored.
  • Christianity signaled the end of paganism, and the final separation of man from nature. From now on, culture will dominate nature, the phallus will dominate the womb, permanence will dominate change, and the fear of death will dominate everything.
    • Maybe it’s unsophisticated to venerate mountains and regard rivers as sacred, but as long as man thinks of his natural environment as holy, then he’s gonna respect it and not sell it out or foul it up.
  • To an artist a metaphor is as real as a dollar.
  • The fear of death is the beginning of slavery…
  • Whatsoever is given precedence over life will take precedence over life, and will end in eliminating life.
    • Since economics, at its most abstract level, is the religion of our people, no noneconomic happening can radically alter the souls of our people.
  • To look for meaning – or the lack of it – in things is a game played by beings of limited consciousness. Behind everything in life is a process that is beyond meaning – but not beyond understanding.
  • A man can be as free and as happy as he wants to be because there’s nothing to lose and nothing to gain.
  • Her face is flushed with that passionate serenity that is evidently known only by those who live outside of man’s laws and according to nature’s.
  • Your head is like a cup. It has limited capacity and if you want to learn something about the world you should keep your head empty in order to learn it. It’s very easy to spend your whole life swishing old tea around in your cup thinking it’s great stuff because you’ve never really tried anything new…
  • [Peyote] The experience is determined by the person’s mental stage, the structure of his or her personality, the physical setting, and cultural influences.
  • Man is not suited to scientific objective study. Objects of scientific study are supposed to hold still. They’re supposed to follow the laws of cause and effect in such a way that a given cause will always have a given effect, over and over again. Man doesn’t do this. Not even savages.
  • The fundamental nature of reality is outside language; that language splits things up into parts while the true nature of reality is undivided.
    • Thought is not a path to reality. It sets obstacles in that path because when you try to use thought to approach something that is prior to thought your thinking does not carry you toward that something. It carries you away from it. To define something is to subordinate it to a tangle of intellectual relationships. And when you do that you destroy real understanding.
    • Purity, identified, ceases to be purity. Objections to pollution are a form of pollution.
  • Positivism is a philosophy that emphasizes science as the only source of knowledge. It sharply distinguish fact and value, and is hostile to religion and traditional metaphysics.
  • The culture in which we live hands us a set of intellectual glasses to interpret experience with, and the concept of primacy of subjects and objects is built right into these glasses.

Common sense – non-weirdness – is just a bundle of prejudices acquired before the age of eighteen. – Albert Einstein

  • Value is the reality that brings the thoughts to mind.
  • Empiricists’ believe – experience is the starting point of all reality.
  • Within the Metaphysics of Quality, science is a set of static intellectual patterns describing this reality, but the patterns are not the reality they describe.
  • Once a thief is caught a whole string of crimes is often solved.
  • In any hierarchy of metaphysical classification the most important division is the first one, for this division dominates everything beneath it. If this first division is bad there is no way you can ever build a really good system of classification around it.

Mankind is driven forward by dim apprehensions of things too obscure for its existing language. – A.N. Whitehead

  • Good is conformity to an established pattern of fixed values and value objects.
    • Static morality is full of heroes and villains, loves and hatreds, carrots and sticks.
  • Although Dynamic Quality, the Quality of freedom, creates this world in which we live, these patterns of static quality, the quality of order, preserve our world. Neither static nor Dynamic Quality can survive without the other.
  • That was the mistake. He let himself get caught in the kind of “picking-and-choosing” situation that Zen avoids, and now he was stuck.

Evolution is recklessly opportunistic: it favors any variation that provides a competitive advantage over other members of an organism’s own population or over individuals of different species. For billions of years this process has automatically fueled what we call evolutionary progress. No program controlled or directed this progression. It was the result of spur of the moment decisions of natural selection. – Ernst Mayr

  • Science value static patterns.
    • A deviation from a normal static pattern is something to be explained and if possible controlled.
  • Dynamic Quality, the source of all things, the pre-intellectual cutting edge of reality, always appears as “spur of the moment.”
    • Natural selection is Dynamic Quality at work.
    • Life is a migration of static patterns toward Dynamic Quality.
  • A Dynamic advance is meaningless unless it can find some static pattern with which to protect itself from degeneration back to the conditions that existed before the advance was made.
    • Evolution can’t be a continuous forward movement. It must be a process of ratchet-like steps…
    • What’s good is freedom from domination by any static pattern, but that freedom doesn’t have to be obtained by the destruction of the patters themselves.
    • Need to obtain static and Dynamic Quality simultaneously.
    • If you don’t have the static patterns of scientific knowledge to build upon you’re back with the cave man. But if you don’t have the freedom to change those patterns you’re blocked from any further growth.

We are suspended in language. – Niels Bohr

  • Our intellectual (scientific) description of nature is always culturally derived.
    • Nature tells us only what our culture predisposes us to hear. The selection of which inorganic patterns to observe and which to ignore is made on the basis of social patterns of value, or when it is not, on the basis of biological patterns of value.
  • In general, given a choice of two courses to follow and all other things being equal, that choice which is more Dynamic, that is, at a higher level of evolution, is more moral.
    • E.g. It’s more moral for a doctor to kill a germ than to allow the germ to kill his patient.
    • Ideas are patterns value. They are at a higher level of evolution than social patterns of value. Just as it is more moral for a doctor to kill a germ than a patient, so it is more moral for an ideal to kill a society than it is for a society to kill an idea.
  • Morality is not a simple set of rules. It’s a very complex struggle of conflicting patterns of values. This conflict is the residue of evolution. As new pattern evolve they come into conflict with old ones. Each stage of evolution creates in its wake a wash of problems.
    • Morality is nothing more than a social convention.
  • It’s not the “nice” guys who bring about real social change. “Nice” guys look nice because they’re conforming. It’s the “bad” guys, who only look nice a hundred years late, that are the real Dynamic force in social evolution.
  • The intelligence of the mind can’t think of any reason to live, but it goes on anyway because the intelligence of the cells can’t think of any reason to die.
  • Biological man doesn’t invent cities or societies any more than pig and chickens invent the farmer that feeds them. The force of evolutionary creation isn’t contained by substance. Substance is just one kind of static pattern left behind by the creative force.
  • “Mankind” has never been interested in getting itself killed. But the superorganism, the Giant, who is a pattern of values superimposed on top of biological human bodies, doesn’t mind losing a few bodies to protect his greater interests.
  • You go to any socialist city and it’s always a dull place because there’s little Dynamic Quality…A freemarket is a Dynamic institution…The market is always changing and the direction of that change can never be predetermined.
  • When things are organized in a free-enterprise parallel, an increase in complexity becomes an increase in diversity more capable of responding to Dynamic Quality, and thus an increase of the probability of success.
  • Scientific truth is provisional.
    • Science always contains an eraser, a mechanism whereby new Dynamic insight could wipe out old static patterns without destroying science itself. Thus science, unlike orthodox theology, has been capable of continuous, evolutionary growth.
    • The pencil is mightier than the pen.
  • Central problem in the static-Dynamic conflict of evolution: how do you tell the saviors from the degenerates? Particularly when they look alike, talk alike and break all the rules alike? Freedoms that save the saviors also save the degenerates and allow them to tear the whole society apart. But restriction that stop the degenerates also stop the creative Dynamic forces of evolution.
  • They think that because they pay you money, which is a social form of gratification, they are entitled to do as they please with the intellectual truth of a book.
  • The one dominating question of the 20th century has been, “Are the social pattern of our world going to run our intellectual life, or is our intellectual life going ot run the social patterns?”
    • The new culture that has emerges is the first in history to believe that patterns of society must be subordinate to patterns of intellect.
  • Science, the intellectual pattern that has been appointed to take over society, has a defect in it – the subject-object science has no provision for morality.
    • Subject-object science is only concerned with facts. Morals have no objective reality…They are all in your head. They exist only in your imagination.
  • Cities function on punctuality and attention to material detail.
  • In the ‘60s it was thought that both society and intellect together were the cause of all the unhappiness and that the transcendence of both society and intellect would cure it.
  • Man is always the measure of all things, even in matters of space and dimension.
  • The scientific laws of the universe are invented by sanity. There’s no way by which sanity, using the instruments of its own creation, can measure that which is outside of itself and its creations. Insanity isn’t an “object” of observation. It’s an alternation of observation itself. There is no such thing as a “disease” of patterns of intellect. There’s only heresy. And that’s what insanity really is.
    • Insanity is an intellectual pattern. It may have biological causes but it has no physical or biological reality.
    • Insanity always exists in relation to others.
    • Insanity is culturally defined. It occurs in all cultures but each culture has different criteria for what constitutes it.
    • Sanity is not truth. Sanity is conformity to what is socially expected. Truth is sometimes in conformity, sometimes not.
    • A philosophy of insanity generated by a Metaphysics of Quality states that all these conflicting intellectual truth are just value patterns. One can vary from a particular common historical and geographical truth pattern without being crazy.

The fact of the matter is that the “real world” is to large extend unconsciously build up on the language habits of the group…Forms and significances which seem obvious to an outsider will be denied outright by those who carry out the patterns; outlines and implications that are perfectly clear to these may be absent to the eye of the onlooker. – Edward Sapir

Any language is more than an instrument of conveying ideas, more even than an instrument for working upon the feelings of others and for self-expression. Every language is also a means of categorizing experience. The events of the “real” world are never felt or reported as a machine would do it. There is a selection process and an interpretation in the very act of response. Some features of the external situation are highlighted, others are ignored or not fully discriminated.

Every people has its own characteristic class in which individuals pigeonhole their experiences. The language says, as it were, “notice this,” “always consider this separate from that,” “such and such thing always belong together.” Since persons are trained from infancy to respond in these ways they take such discriminations for granted as part of the inescapable part of life. – Clyde Kluckhohn

  • Your static value system filters out the undesirable opinions and preserves the desirable ones.
  • Seeing is not believing. Believe is seeing.
  • We build up whole cultural intellectual patterns based on past “facts” which are extremely selective. When a new fact comes in that does not fit the pattern we don’t throw out the pattern. We throw out the fact. A contradictory fact has to keep hammering and hammering and hammering, sometimes for centuries, before maybe one or two people see it.
  • Human is a complex ecology of patterns moving toward Dynamic Quality. Man is an evolutionary battle against the static patterns of his own life.
  • Pragmatism: The test of truth is its practicality or usefulness.

There must always be a discrepancy between concepts and reality, because the former are static and discontinuous while the latter is dynamic and flowing. – William James

  • The primal reality from which subjects and objects spring is value…Value, the pragmatic test of truth, is also the primary empirical experience. (Unites pragmatism and radical empiricism)

Our greatest blessings come to us by way of madness provided the madness is given us by divine gift. – Socrates

  • In all religions bishops tend to gild Dynamic Quality with all sorts of static interpretations because their cultures require it. But these interpretations become like golden vines that cling to a tree, shut out its sunlight and eventually strangle it.
  • Dharma is Quality itself, the principle of “rightness” which gives structure and purpose to the evolution of all life and to the evolving understanding of the universe which life has created.
  • The Zen monk’s daily life is nothing but one ritual after another, hour after hour, day after day, all his life. They don’t tell him to shatter those static patterns to discover the unwritten Dharma. They want him to get those patterns perfect! The explanation for this contradiction is the belief that you do not free yourself from static patterns by fighting them with other contrary static patterns. You free yourself from static patterns by putting them to sleep. That is, you master them with such proficiency that they become an unconscious part of your nature. You get so used to them you completely forget them and they are gone. There in the center of the most monotonous boredom of static ritualistic patterns the Dynamic freedom is found.
  • In cultures without books ritual seem to be a public library for teaching the young and preserving common values and information.

While sustaining biological and social patterns, kill all intellectual patterns. Kill them completely. And then follow Dynamic Quality. And morality will be served.

  • You could discover a lot about a culture by what it said about its idols. The idols would be an objectification of the culture’s innermost values, which were its reality.
  • A supernova occurs when a giant star, one much bigger than our own Sun, collapses and then spectacularly explodes, releasing in an instant the energy of a hundred billion suns, burning for a time more brightly than all the stars in its galaxy.
  • It’s one of those rare areas where the absence of evidence is evidence.
  • To a physicist, mass and weight are two quite different things.
    • Your mass stays the same wherever you go.
    • Your weight varies depending on how far you are from the center of some other massive object like a planet.
    • On Earth, for all practical purposes, mass and weight are the same.
  • A rusting object doesn’t lose weight.
  • Conservation of mass – if you burned this book now, its matter would be changed to ash and smoke, but the net amount of stuff in the universe would be the same.
  • Energy is liberated matter; matter is energy waiting to happen – They are two forms of the same thing.
  • In essence what relativity says is that space and time are not absolute, but relative both to the observer and to the thing being observed, and the faster one moves the more pronounced these effects become.
In some sense, gravity does not exist; what moves the planets and stars is the distortion of space and time. – Michio Kaku
  • Chemists tend to think in terms of molecules rather than elements in much the way writers tend to think in terms of words and not letters…
  • Atoms are very abundant…They are also fantastically durable…Every atom you possess has almost certainly passed through several stars and been part of millions of organisms on its way to becoming you.
    • So we are all reincarnations – though short-lived ones…Atoms themselves, however, go on practically for ever.
    • Atoms are small, numerous, practically indestructible.
    • Atoms are mostly empty space and that the solidity we experience all around us is an illusion.
  • The number of proton is what gives an atom its chemical identity.
Things on a small scale behave nothing like things on a large scale. – Richard Feynman
  • Lead is a neurotoxin. Get too much of it and you can irreparably damage the brain and central nervous system.
    • Because lead is for ever, Americans alive today each have about 625 times more lead in their blood than people did a century ago.
  • The upshot of all this is that we live in a universe whose age we can’t quite compute, surrounded by stars whose distances from us and each other we don’t altogether know, filled with matter we can’t identify, operating in conformance with physical laws whose properties we don’t truly understand.
The history of any one part of the Earth, like the life of a soldier, consists of long periods of boredom and short periods of terror. – British geologist Derek V. Ager
  • Rich volcanic plains are ideal for growing potatoes, as Idaho’s farmers long ago discovered.
  • The body remains at the same pressure as the surrounding water, and is not crushed at depth. It is the gases inside your body, particularly in the lungs, that cause the trouble in deep ocean.
  • Portions of the Earth on which we are prepared or able to live are modest indeed: 12% of the total land area, and only 4% of the whole surface if you include the seas.
  • It is easy to make any banal situation seem extraordinary if you treat it as fateful.
    • Richard Feynman’s illustration: You know, the most amazing thing happened to me tonight. I saw a car with the licence plate ARW357. Can you imagine? Of all the millions of licence plates in the state, what was the chance that I would see that particular one tonight? Amazing!
  • Sunlight energizes atoms. It increases the rate at which they jiggle and jounce, and in their enlivened state they crash into one another, releasing heat.
    • When you feel the sun warm on your back on a summer’s day, it’s really excited atoms you feel.
  • Wind is simply the air’s way of trying to keep things in balance.
    • Air always flows from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure, and the greater the discrepancy in pressures, the faster the wind blows.
  • 97% of all the water on Earth is in the seas, the greater part of it in the Pacific, which is bigger than all the land masses put together.
    • Of the 3% of Earth’s water that is fresh, most exists as ice sheets.
      • 0.036% is found in lakes, rivers, and reservoirs.
    • Only about 0.035% of the Earth’s fresh water (0.001% of Earth’s water) is floating around above us at any moment.
  • As The Economist has put it: ” The key to long life, it seems, is not to do too much.”
  • The only time your continuing well-being is of consequence to a pathogen is when it kills you too well. If they eliminate you before they can move on, then they may well die out themselves.
    • Too much efficiency is not a good thing for any infectious organism.
  • Viruses prosper by hijacking the genetic material of a living cell, and using it to produce more virus.
  • For all the trouble they take to assemble and preserve themselves, species crumple and die remarkably routinely. And the more complex they get, the more quickly they appear to go extinct. Which is perhaps one reason why so much of life isn’t terribly ambitious.
The alternative to extinction is stagnation and stagnation is seldom a good thing in any realm. – Ian Tattersall
  • Extinction is always bad news for the victims, of course, but it appears to be a good thing for a dynamic planet. (We are speaking here of extinction as a natural, long-term process. Extinction brought about by human carelessness is another matter altogether.)
Humans are here today because our particular line never fractured – never once at any of the billion points that could have erased us from history. – Stephen Jay
  • Most living cells seldom last more than a month or so, but there are some notable exceptions.
    • Liver cells can survive for years, thought the components within them may be renewed every few days.
    • Brain cells last as long as you do.
  • When, as occasionally happens, a cell fails to expire in the prescribed manner, but rather begins to divide and proliferate wildly, we call the result cancer. Caner cells are really just confused cells…Cells make this mistake fairly regularly, but the body has elaborate mechanisms for dealing with it…Cancer is bad luck in every possible sense of the term.
  • The balance between accuracy and errors in replication is a fine one. Too many errors and the organism can’t function, but too few and it sacrifices adaptability.
Wherever you go in the world, whatever animal, plant, bug or blob you look at, if it is alive, it will use the same dictionary and know the same code. All life is one. – Matt Ridley
Anything that is true of E. coli must be true of elephants, except more so. – Jacques Monod
  • It cannot be said too often: all life is one. That is, and I suspect will forever prove to be, the most profound true statement there is.
    • Remarkably, we are quite closely related to fruit and vegetables. About half the chemical functions that take place in a banana are fundamentally the same as the chemical functions that take place in you.
One of the hardest idea for humans to accept is that we are not the culmination of anything. There is nothing inevitable about our being here. It is part of our vanity as humans that we tend to think of evolution as a process that, in effect, was programmed to produce us. – Ian Tattersall
  • If this book has a lesson, it is that we are awfully lucky to be here – and by “we” I mean every living thing. To attain any kind of life at all in this universe of ours appears to be quite an achievement.
[Click here for more on Metaphysics of Quality]
  • Plans are deliberately indefinite, more to travel than to arrive anywhere.
  • We want to make good time, but for us now this is measured with emphasis on “good” rather than “time” and when you make that shift in emphasis the whole approach changes.
  • One does not convert individuals into mass people with the simple coining of a mass term.
  • Mass hypnosis. In a very orthodox form known as “education.”
  • Logic exists in the mind. Numbers exist only in the mind…Science is only in your mind too.
  • The world has no existence whatsoever outside the human imagination.
  • If someone’s ungrateful and you tell him he’s ungrateful, okay, you’ve called him a name. You haven’t solved anything.
  • It was an intrusion on his reality. I just blew a hole right through his whole groovy way of looking at things and he would not face up to it because it seemed to threaten his whole lifestyle.
  • The romantic mode is primarily inspirational, imaginative, creative, intuitive. Feelings rather than facts predominate.
    • Art does not proceed by reason or by laws. It proceeds by feeling, intuition and esthetic conscience.
  • We take a handful of sand from the endless landscape of awareness around us and call that handful of sand the world.
    • We divide the sand into parts. This and that. Here and there. Black and white. Now and then. The discrimination is the division of the conscious universe into parts.
  • Instead of just dwelling on what is killed it’s important also to see what’s created and to see the process as a kind of death-birth continuity that neither good nor bad, but just is.
  • I look at the shapes of the steel now and I see ideas. He thinks I’m working on parts. I’m working on concepts.
  • To tear down a factory or to revolt against a government or to avoid repair of a motorcycle because it is a system is to attack effects rather than causes; and as long as the attack is upon effects only, no change is possible. The true system, the real system, is our present construction of systematic thought itself, rationality itself, and if a factory is torn down but the rationality which produced it is left standing, then that rationality will simply produce another factory.
  • Two kinds of logic:
    • Induction – reasoning from particular experiences to general truth.
    • Deduction – start with general knowledge and predict a specific observation.
  • Actually the physical labor is the smallest and easiest part of what the mechanic doe. By far the greatest part of his work is careful observation and precise thinking.

In the temple of science are many mansions…and various indeed are they that dwell therein and the motives that have led them there. Many take to science out of a joyful sense of superior intellectual power; science is their own special sport to which they look for vivid experience and the satisfaction of ambition; many others are to be found in the temple who have offered the products of their brains on this altar for purely utilitarian purposes. – Albert Einstein

Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world; he then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it. This is what the painter, the poet, the speculative philosopher, and the natural scientists do, each in his own fashion. Each makes this cosmos and its construction the pivot of his emotional life, in order to find in this way peace and security which he cannot find in the narrow whirlpool of personal experience. The supreme task of the physicist is to arrive at those universal elementary laws from which the cosmos can be built up by pure deduction. There is no logical path to these laws; only intuition, resting on sympathetic understanding of experience, can reach them. – Albert Einstein

  • The number of rational hypotheses that can explain any given phenomenon is infinite.
    • If all hypotheses cannot be tested, then the results of any experiment are inconclusive and the entire scientific method falls short of its goal of establishing proven knowledge.
    • The purpose of scientific method is to select a single truth from among many hypothetical truth.
    • Through multiplication upon multiplication of facts, information, theories and hypotheses, it is science itself that is leading mankind from single absolute truths to multiple, indeterminate, relative ones.

Evolution has shown that at any given moment out of all conceivable constructions a single one has always proved itself absolutely superior to the rest. – Albert Einstein

  • Did Einstein really mean to state that truth was a function of time?
    • The whole history of science is a clear story of continuously new and changing explanation of old facts.
  • The cause of our current social crises is a genetic defect within the nature of reason itself…Our current modes of rationality are not moving society forward into a better world.
    • Emotionally hollow, esthetically meaningless, and spiritually empty.
    • It can’t be solved by rational means because the rationality itself is the source of the problem. The only ones who’re solving it are solving it at a personal level by abandoning ‘square’ rationality altogether and going by feelings alone.
  • Institutions such as schools, churches, governments and political organizations of every sort all tended to direct thought for ends other than truth, for the perpetuation of their own functions, and for the control of individuals in the service of these functions.
  • He discovered that the science he’d once thought of as the whole world of knowledge is only a branch of philosophy, which is far broader and far more general.
  • If all of human knowledge, everything that’s known, is believed to be an enormous hierarchic structure, then the high country of the mind is found at the uppermost reaches of this structure in the most general, the most abstract considerations of all. Few people travel here. There’s no real profit to be made from wandering through it, yet like this high country of the material world all around us, it has its own austere beauty that to some people make the hardships of traveling through it seem worthwhile.
  • Empiricist – one who believes all knowledge is derived exclusively from the senses.
    • The scientific method of experimentation is carefully controlled empiricism.
  • The a priori concepts (time, space) have their origins in human nature so that they’re neither caused by the sense object nor bring it into being, but provide a kind of screening function for what sense data we will accept.
  • Logic presumes a separation of subject from object; therefore logic is not final wisdom.
    • The illusion of separation of subject from object is best removed by the elimination of physical activity, mental activity and emotional activity -> Meditation
  • Because he’d given up, the surface of life was comfortable for him.
  • The real University is a state of mind…The real University is nothing less than the continuing body of reason itself.
  • You are never dedicated to something you have complete confident in. No one is fanatically shouting that the sun is going to rise tomorrow. They know it’s going to rise tomorrow. When people are fanatically dedicated to political or religious faiths or any other kinds of dogmas or goals, it’s always because these dogmas or goals are in doubt.
  • If you have to choose among an infinite number of ways to put it together then the relation of the machine to you, and the relation of the machine and you to the rest of the world, has to be considered, because the selection from among many choices, the art of the work is just as dependent upon your own mind and spirit as it is upon the material of the machine. That’s why you need the peace of mind.
  • The only real learning results from hang-ups, where instead of expanding the branches of what you already know, you have to stop and drift laterally for a while until you come across something that allows you to expand the roots of what you already know.
    • Same thing occurs with whole civilizations when expansion’s needed at the roots.
  • If you do not imitate what the teacher wants you get a bad grade.
  • Eliminate the whole degree-and-grading system and then you’ll get real education.
    • The student’s biggest problem was a slave mentality which had been built into him by years of carrot-and-whip grading, a mule mentality which said, “If you don’t whip me, I won’t work.”
    • He didn’t get whipped. He didn’t work. And the cart of civilization, which he supposedly was being trained to pull, was just going to have to creak along a little slower without him.
    • He’d no longer be a grade-motivated person. He’d be a knowledge-motivated person. He would need no external pushing to learn. His push would come from inside. He’d be a free man.
    • The real purpose of withholding the grades was to force them to look within themselves, the only place they would ever get a really right answer.
  • Grades really cover up failure to teach.
  • Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. The reality of your own nature should determine the speed. If you become restless, speed up. If you become winded, slow down. You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion. Then, when you’re no longer thinking ahead, each footstep isn’t just a means to an end but a unique event in itself. This leaf has jagged edges. This rock looks loose. From this place the snow is less visible, even though closer. These are things you should notice anyway. To live only for some future goal is shallow. It’s the sides of the mountain which sustain life, not the top. Here’s where things grow. But of course, without the top you can’t have any sides. It’s the top that defines the sides.

No one ever travels so high as he who knows not where he is going. – Oliver Cromwell

  • It made the kids at camp much more enthusiastic and cooperative when they had ego goals to fulfill, but ultimately that kind of motivation is destructive. Any effort that has self-glorification as its final endpoint is bound to end in disaster.
  • When you try to climb a mountain to prove how big you are, you almost never make it. And even if you do it’s a hollow victory.
    • In order to sustain the victory you have to prove yourself again and again in some other ways…driven forever to fill a false image, haunted by the fear that the image is not true and someone will find out.
    • He’s here but he’s not here. He rejects the here, is unhappy with it, wants to be farther up the trail but when he gets there will be just as unhappy because then it will be “here.” What he’s looking for, what he wants, is all around him, but he doesn’t want that because it is all around him. Every step is an effort, both physically and spiritually, because he imagines his goal to be external and distant.
  • Definitions are the foundation of reason. You cannot reason without them.
  • It was a certain basic attitude about the way the world was, a presumptive vision that it ran according to laws – reason – and that man’s improvement lay chiefly through the discovery of these laws of reason and application of them toward satisfaction of his own desires. It was this faith that held everything together.
  • We have proved that quality, though undefined, exists.
  • In today’s world, ideas that are incompatible with scientific knowledge don’t get off the ground.
  • The present is our only reality.
    • Any intellectually conceived object is always in the past and therefore unreal. Reality is always the moment of vision before the intellectualization takes place. There is no other reality.
  • The ones who have the easiest time seeing this Quality are small children, uneducated people and culturally “deprived” people. These have the least predisposition toward intellectuality from cultural sources and have the least formal training to instill it further into them. That is why squareness is such a uniquely intellectual disease.
  • Quality is shapeless, formless, indescribable. To see shapes and forms is to intellectualize.
    • We constantly seek to find, in the Quality event, analogues to our previous experiences. We build up our language in terms of these analogues. We build up our whole culture in term of these analogues.
  • People differ about Quality, not because Quality is different, but because people are different in terms of experience.
  • The process of philosophic explanation is an analytic process, a process of breaking something down into subjects and predicates.
    • Quality cannot be broken down into subjects and predicates. This not because Quality is so mysterious but because Quality is so simple, immediate and direct.
  • We invent earth and heavens, trees, stones and oceans, gods, music, arts, language, philosophy, engineering, civilization and science. We call these analogues reality. And they are reality. We mesmerize our children in the name of truth into knowing that they are reality. We throw anyone who does not accept these analogues into an insane asylum.
  • Art is the Godhead as revealed in the works of man.
  • One geometry cannot be more true than another; it can only be more convenient. Geometry is not true, it is advantageous.
    • Conventional nature of concepts of science, such as space and time – there isn’t one way of measuring these entities that is more true than another; that which is generally adopted is only more convenient.
  • Classic beauty, which comes from the harmonious order of the parts, and which a pure intelligence can grasp, which gives structure to romantic beauty and without which life would be only vague and fleeting, a dream from which one could not distinguish one’s dreams because there would be no basis for making the distinction. It is the quest of this special classic beauty, the sense of harmony of the cosmos, which makes us choose the facts most fitting to contribute to this harmony. It is not the facts but the relation of things that results in the universal harmony that is the sole objective reality.
  • Selection of facts before you “observe” them is “whatever you like” only in a dualistic, subject-object metaphysical system!
  • The past cannot remember the past. The future can’t generate the future. The cutting edge of this instant right here and now is always nothing less than the totality of everything there is.
  • Value is the predecessor of structure. It’s the preintellectual awareness that gives rise to it. Our structured reality is preselected on the basis of value, and really to understand structured reality required an understanding of the value source form which it’s derived.
  • Reality is, in its essential nature, not static but dynamic. And when you really understand dynamic reality you never get stuck. It has forms but the forms are capable of changes.
  • The solution to the problem often at first seems unimportant or undesirable, but the state of stuckness allows it, in time, to assume its true importance.
  • It’s the style that gets you; technological ugliness syruped over with romantic phoniness in an effort to produce beauty and profit by people who, though stylish, don’t know where to start because no one has ever told them there’s such a thing as Quality in this world and it’s real, not style…Real quality must be the source of the subjects and objects, the cone from which the tree must start.
  • We have artists with no scientific knowledge and scientists with no artistic knowledge and both with no spiritual sense of gravity at all, and the results is not just bad, it is ghastly.
  • Inner peace of mind occurs on three levels of understanding:
    • Physical quietness
    • Mental quietness
    • Value quietness – one has no wandering desires at all but simply performs the acts of his life without desire.
  • When one isn’t dominated by feelings of separateness from what he’s working on, then one can be said to “care” about what he’s doing.
  • Peace of mind produces right values, right values produce right thoughts. Right thoughts produce right actions and right actions produce work which will be a material reflection for others to see of the serenity at the center of it all – a material reflection of a spiritual reality.
  • The social values are right only if the individual values are right. The place to improve the world is first in one’s own heart and head and hands, and then work outward from there.
  • The effort of fathoming what is in another’s mind creates a distortion of what is seen.
  • If your values are rigid you can’t really learn new facts.
  • If you have a high evaluation of yourself then your ability to recognize new facts is weakened. You ego isolates you from the Quality reality…When false information makes you look good, you are likely to believe it.
  • My favorite cure for boredom is sleep. It’s very easy to get to sleep when bored and very hard to get bored after a long rest.
  • When cleaning I do it the way people go to church – not so much to discover anything new, although I am alert for new things, but mainly to reacquaint myself with the familiar. It’s nice sometimes to go over familiar paths.
  • Impatience is close to boredom but always results from one cause: an underestimation of the amount of time the job will take.
    • Impatience is best handled by allowing an indefinite time for the job, particularly new jobs that require unfamiliar techniques…
  • Science grows by mu answers more than by its yes or no answers. Yes or no confirms or denies a hypothesis. Mu says the answer is beyond the hypothesis. Mu is the “phenomenon” that inspires scientific inquiry in the first place!
  • …thus making an art out of what he is doing, he’s likely to discover that he becomes a much more interesting person and much less of an object to the people around him because his Quality decisions change him too.
  • A good student seeks knowledge fairly and impartially.
  • People who can’t stand Aristotle’s endless specificity of detail are natural lovers of Plato’s souring generalities. People who can’t stand the eternal lofty idealism of Plato welcome the down-to-earth of Aristotle. Plato is the essential Buddha-seeker who appears again and again in each generation, moving onward and upward toward the “one.” Aristotle is the eternal motorcycle mechanic who prefers the “many.”

The world exists as a conflict and tension of opposites. There is a One and there is a Many and the One is the universal law which is immanent in all things.Heraclitus

  • Virtue, if implies anything at all, implies an ethical absolute. A person whose idea of what is proper varies from day to day can be admired for his broadmindness, but not for his virtue.

What moves the Greek warrior to deeds of heroism is not a sense of duty as we understand it – duty towards others: it is rather duty towards himself. – Kitto

  • Arete (excellence) implies a respect for the wholeness or oneness of life, and a consequent dislike of specialization. It implies a contempt for efficiency – or rather a much higher idea of efficiency, an efficiency which exists not in one department of life but in life itself.
    • Arete is dead and science, logic and the University as we know it today have been given their founding charter: to find and invent an endless proliferation of forms about the substantive elements of the world and call these forms knowledge, and transmit these forms to future generations. As “the system.”
  • We always condemn most in others that which we most fear in ourselves.
  • Happiness and good are not objective terms. We cannot deal with them scientifically. An since they aren’t objective they just exist in your mind. So you want to be happy just change your mind. Ha-ha, ha-ha.
  • Since the One is the source of all things and includes all things in it, it cannot be defined in terms of those things, since no matter what thing you use to define it, the thing will always describe something less than the One itself.
  • When a shepherd goes to kill a wolf, and takes his dog to see the sport, he should take care to avoid mistakes. The dog has certain relationships to the wolf the shepherd may have forgotten.
  • The Church of Reason, like all institutions of the System, is based not on individual strength but upon individual weakness. What’s really demanded in the Church of Reason is not ability, but inability. Then you are considered teachable. A truly able person is always a threat.
  • I survived mainly by pleasing others. You do that to get out. To get out you figure out what they want you to say and then you say it with as much skill and originality as possible and then, if they’re convinced, you get out.
  • Material success was the American dream.
  • I go on living, more from force of habit than anything else.